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Athens College Ijibrary 
A.t.bienR. Alabama 




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THE MAID OF ATHENS 

Copyright. 1928. by 

Eunice Murphy 

and 

Marguerite Beeves 



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1928 

Published by 

The Students 

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FOREWORD 



It is the purpose of the Staff 
to publish this edition of The 
Maid of Athens in order to 
place before the students of Ath- 
ens College a brief history of the 
year nineteen hundred twenty- 
eight. We have tried to include 
in this book the college activities 
and to arrange the sections so 
that in after years when we 
scan its pages we may find it a 
book of pleasant memories and 
may live again the many happy 
hours we have spent in our Alma 
Mater. 

If we have succeeded in ac- 
complishing this, we do not 
count our efforts in vain. 



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CONTENTS 



Prologue 
ADMINISTRATION 

Act 1 
CLASSES 

Act II 
ORGANIZATIONS 

Act III 
ATHLETICS 

Act IV 
FEATURES 

Act V 
RRERS ACADEMY 

Epilogue 
ALLlMNAE ASSOCIATION 



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"1 



DEDICATION 



To Mrs. McCoy, our beloved 
President, we dedicate the 1928 
Maid of Athens. We shall al- 
ways remember her as an exam- 
ple of that patient and loving 
kindness which is characteris- 
tic of a true Christian. Her 
personal interest in each girl 
makes her dearer each year. 
Our love for her cannot be ex- 
pressed in words. 



1 : 



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MRS. JAMES H. McCOY 

President 




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ADMINISTRATION 



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A spleiidof falls on Athens Halls, 
A scene of beauty, a joy forever. 




MARY COWPER PITTMAN, A.B., A.M. 

DEAN 



17 



Maid of Athens 



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FACULTY 



MRS. FRANK M. CHURCH. A.B. 

University of Illinois. 

Professor of Home Eco^nomics 

MR. FRANK M. CHURCH 
Graduate of New England Conservatory : Ober- 
lin Conservatory : Organ Student of E. E. Glubb 
and George E. Whiting : two years in Europe 
with Guilniant, Widro. and Swayne. 

Professor of Piano Music and Pipe Organ 

MRS. M. E. BECKETT 

Graduate of Ntw England Conservatory of Music. 

Professor of Violin. 

L. PEARL BOGGS. A.B.. Ph.D. 
University of Illinois ; University of Hallo ; 
Honorary Fellow of Cornell University. 

Professor of Education and Psycho(o(/y 



JESSIE CARR BOURNE. B.S.. A.M. 
George Peabody College for Teachers. 
Professor of Home Economics 

PAUL COOKE. A.B. 

Birmingham-Southern College. 

Instructor in English and Journalism 

LAURA E. DAVIS. A.B.. A.M. 

University of Alabama. 

Professor of Latin and Spanish 

DR. W. J. HAGAN 

College Physician 

MRS. ETHEL M. HAGOOD 

Nurse 

ALICE HEAP, A.B., A.M. 

University of Tennessee, 

Professor of Science 



FRANCES LeDOYT YEARLEY 

Graduate. Voice and Piano. Knox Conservatory of Music. Galesburg. Illinois. 1920; Pupil of Madam Hanna 

Butler, Chicago, Illinois, Voice; Pupil of Isaac Van Grove, Voice, Chicago Mudcal College. 1925. 

Professor of Voice 




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FACULTY 



EDWARD GOODRICH. A.B.. A.M. 
University of Virginia. 
Professor of History 
MARY L. HUNT 
Collins Commercial College, Greenville, Texas. 
Cominervial Instructor 
EDWARD G. MACKEY. A.B., Litt.D. 
Emory University ; Birmingham-Southern Col- 
lege ; Graduate work, Columbia University. 
Professor of Sociology and Religious Education 
MRS. ROBERT H. McCONNELL. B.S. 
Alabama State College ; Graduate Student. 
College Dietitian 
HATTIE MAE PARKER 
Academic Training. Littleton College ; Louis- 
berg College : Graduate. Boston School of Expres- 
sion ; Graduate. Physical Education, Boston School 
of Expression. 
Professor of Expression and Physical Education 

KATHERINE F. PEEBLES, A.B.. A.M. 

Vanderbilt University : University of Michigan. 

Professor of French 



GRACE ROWLAND. B.S. 

Peabody College for Teachers 

Instructor in Bible 

JOSEPHINE STONE, B.S., M.A. 
George Peabody College for Teachers ; Vander- 
bilt Universi;:y. 

Professor of Mathematics 

MRS. E. K. TURNER 
New York Art Students' League; Pennsylvania 
Academy of Fine Arts. 

Professor of Art 

NELDA E. WERNEKE 
Graduate and Postgraduate of De Pauw Uni- 
versity School of Music ; Pupil of Severin Eisen- 
berger, Berlin. Germany ; Pupil of Howard Wells. 
Chicago, and of Madame Melville Liszniewska, 
Cincinnati. 

Professor of Piano 

MRS. ELIZABETH WHEELER. B.A. 
Hostess. Sanders Hall 




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CLASSES 



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SENIOR CLASS 



OFFICERS 



Marguerite Reeves 
JiMMiE Fay Whitley 
Eunice Murphy . 

Sarah Ormak . 



. President 
Vice President 
. Secretary" 
Treasurer 



21 




Martha Josephine Ayres, 

E)iglifih 



A.B. 



Emily Neville 



Member of Phi Si^ma Literary Society. 

Member of Dramatic Club. 

President of Dramatic Club. 

Member of Latin Club. 

Member of French Club. 

Member of Art Club. 

Member of Tennessee Club. 

Member of Cosmopolitan Club. 



JCVVEL HULCAN 




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Soph. Sister 



LuciLE Darby, A.B. 
English 

Member of Latin Club. 

Vies President of Latin Club. 

Member of Phi Si(jma Literar.v Society, 

Member of Dramatic Club. 

Member of Glee Club. 

Member of Tennis Club. 

Member of French Club. 



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Soph. Sister 



22 




LouNETTE Faust, B.S. 
Home Economics 

Secretary and Treasurer of Home Economics Club. 

Member of Home Economics Club. 

Vice President of Sigma Delta Literary Society. 

Vice President of Student Government. 

President of Student Council. 

President of Home Economics Club. 

Member of Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. 

Member of Art Club. 

Member of Glee Club. 



Maky Morelock 




Ethbl Cookg 




Soph. Sister 



Soph. Sister 



Rebekah Fennell, A.B. 
English 

President of Dramatic Club, '2.'j. 
Certificate in Expres.sion, '25. 
Diploma in Expression. '26. 
President of Dramatic Club. '26. 
Vice President of Spanish Club. 
Sij;ma Delta. '25-'2H. 
Art Club, *28. 
Music Club. '25-'26. 
Hiking Captain. 
Horseback Riding Captain. 
Swimming Captain. 



23 




Evelyn Waldrop 



Annie Myrtle Mason, B.S. 
Hovie Ecmiomics 

Member of SiRma Delta Literary Society. 
Member of Home Economics Club. 
Member of French Club. 
Member of Art Club. 



Verba Simms 





Soph. Sister 



Soph. Sister 

Sarah Eunice Murphy, A.B. 

"Andy Mui'phy" 

French 

Member of the Siema Delta Literary Society : Member of the Mathematics Club. 
'2!), '2G : Vice President of the Siuma Delta Literary Society, '2h : Varsity Basket- 
ball Team, '25. '26, '27. '28 : Captain of the Hasketball Ttam, '26 : Treasurer of the 
SlKma Delta Literary Society, '26 ; Member of th^ Latin Club, '26 : Vice President 
of the Athletic Association, '26 : Assistant Editor of The MaII) OP Athens, '27 ; 
Vice President of Le Cercle Francais, '27 : RidinB Captain, '27 : Editor of The 
Maid of Athens. '28 : President of Le Cercle Francais. '28 : Member of the "A" 
Club. '28 ; Secretary of the Seoior Class, '28 : Vice President of the Athletic Asso- 
ciation. '28 : Member of the BirminRham Club, '28 ; Member of the Spanish Cluh, 
'28 : Awarded the Sanders Scholarship Medal, '25, "26, '27. 



24 




Sarah Mae Orman, B.S., B.M. 
Mathematics 

Phi Sigma Literary Society. 

Glee Club. 

Class Secretary, '25. '26. '27. 

Class Treasurer, '28. 

Secretary-Treasurer of Glee Club. '2' 

Mathematics Club. '2.5. 

Rhythmic Orchestra, '27, '28. 



Erma Webb 



Mary Scott 





Soph. Sister 



Soph. Sister 

Edna Marguerite Reeves, A.B. 
"Peggy" 
English 

President oi' Freshman Class : One of the Brauties of The 
Maid of Athens, '25 : President of Sophomore Class : President 
ot Latin Club. '2G : Cheer Leader of Sophomore Class : College 
Cheer Leader in Sophomore year; President of Junior Class: 
Junior Representative of Student Council : Member ot Y. W. 
C. A. Cabinet, '27: President ot Sigma Delta Literary Society; 
President of Senior Class; Business Manager of The Maid of 
Athens, '28; Senior Representative of Student Council; College 
Cheer Leader in Senior year; May Queen in '28. 



25 





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Mabel Orb 



Annie Beadles Sanders, A.B. 
"Bebe" 
Etiglish 

Member of Mathi'matics Club. '25. 

Maid of Honor in May Court, '25. 

Member of Sigma Delta Literary Society. 

Member of Latin Club. 

Secretary and Treasurer of Latin Club. 

Mtmber of French Club. 

Senior Representative of Annual Staff. 





Sop.bi;S|ster 



LiLA Wray Sloan, B.S. 
English 

Member of Sisma Delta Literary Society. 

Member of Art Club. 

Member of Inter-Society Debating Club. 



Sojih. Sister 



26 




MKMORiii Gray Holt 



Mariebeth Tatum, A.B. 
E}igUsh 

Secretary of Student Board. '27. 

Vice President of Phi Sigma Literary Society, '27. 

President of Dramatic Club. 

Member of Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. '27. 

One of the Beauties in The Maid of Athens, '27. in Junior year. 

Senior Class Reporter to the "Crow's Nest." 

One of the Beauties in The Maid of Athens, in Senior year. 



Mary Elizabeth Rutlediie 





Soph. Sister 



JiMMiE Fay Whitley, A.B. 
English 

Treasurer of Sigma Delta Literary Society. 
Secretary of Dramatic Club. "26. 
Member of Mississippi Club. '28. 
Treasurer of Sophomore Class. '26'. 
Treasurer of Y. W. C. A. ■ . ' 
Vice President of Senior Class, 
Mtmber of Mathematics Club, '26. 



27 




Elizabeth Fason 



Tempie Wynn, B.S. 
Home Eco7iotnics 

Member of Phi Sigma Literary Society. 
Member of Home Economics Club. 
Treasurer of Y. W. C. A., '28. 
Member of Preachers' Daughters' Club. '2rt. 
Member of Art Club. 



Edith Dunawav 





Soph. Sister 



Frances Lucile Yarbrough, B.S. 
Home E conomics 

Member of Sigma Delta Literary Society. 
Member of Home Economics Club. 
Member of French Club. 
Member of Ar'. Club. 



Sc.ph. Sister 



28 



Maid of Athens 



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JUNIOR CLASS 



OFFICERS 



Jean McCoy , 
Oni Allgood 

IvELLE Hamilton 



. President 
Vice President 
Secretar\" and Treasurer 




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JUNIORS 



Mary Elizabeth Bell 
Marguerite Phillips Briggs 
Nena Joe Cantrell 



Ruth Malone Chew 
Mary Ellen Cole 
Ivalee Faust 




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Maid of Athens 




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JUNIORS 



Sara Elizabeth Gay 
Charlyn Godbey 
Ruby Jane Graham 



Elise Hall 
Carona Hargrove 
Mary Gladys Hughey 



i^thene College I^lbrary 




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31 



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JUNIORS 



Nan Allen Jones 
Julia Exine Lovin 
Elise Lee McKensie 



Florence Archer Moore 
Effie Kathryn Ozley 
Mabel Ethel Philips 




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Maid of Athens 



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JUNIORS 



Janie Elizabeth Ragan 


Margaret Ross 


WiLMA Howard Rice 


Dorothy Lane Rutland 


Sarah Riggs 


Joeffye G. Streater 




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JUNIORS 



Evelyn Swift 

Edith Tays 

JvLiA Pettus Totherow 



WiLLA White 
Pauline Wood 
BiRTiE Lee WoonROOF 




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SOPHOMORE CLASS 

OFFICERS 

Mary Scott President 

Lucy Haywood Binford Vice President 

Janie Elizabeth Fason Secretary 




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SOPHOMORES 


Cleo Barber 


Edith Mae Duxaway 


Dorothy Benagh 


Catherine Lorene Freeman 


Alma Bullington 


LeRuth Glaze 


Pauline Cagle 


Bertha Barker 


Mildred Caldwell 


Bessie Barker 


Ethel Cooke 


Li-tie Mae Eastep 




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SOPHOMORES 



Memorie Gray Holt 
Jewel Estelle Hulgan 
Martha Louise Hummel 
Margie Isabel Ikard 
ToMY Lou Levie 



Mary Lee Madry 
Nan Eleanor McLellan 
Emalice McWilhams 
Mary Louise Morelock 
Bettie Lou Horton 




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37 



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SOPHOMORES 



Jean Adele Morris 
Helen Maye Nabors 
Ella Mae Neill 
Emily Stuart Neville 
Mable Claire Orr 



Evelyn Elizabeth Richards 
Mary Elizabeth Rutledge 
Tressie Sims 
Verda Sims 
Mildred Caldwell 




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SOPHOMORES 



Annie V\"ade Street 
Augusta Turner 
Evelyn McTyre Waldrop 
Margaret Young Wall 



Erma Webb 

Mabel Pearlene Wilcoxson 

Mary Ruth Young 




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39 



Maid of Athens 

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SOPHOMORE CLASS SON( 




We, the Sophomores of '28, 

Proclaim our loyalty. 

We're the best in the land ; 

Our class is a band; 

For right and learning we stand. Rah ! Rah ! 

We're the peppiest c'ass. Sophomores; 
We lead Athens College in fun. 
Our spirit is best of all. 
Our service is at thy call, 
O, Athens, mother mine ! 

Unfurl our glorious colons — Red and White; 
Lead on our valiant classmates in their delight 
To love and honor always Alma Mater; 
We each and evei-y are thy daughters. 

We'll make the old halls ring with laughter bright, 
l''or we have two more years with you in sight 
To love and cherish till our caps and gowns 
Take us from our college grounds. 

— Evelyn Neill, '29. 



JUNIOR CLASS POEM 



Three short years of working', climbing. 

Onward, upward toward our goal. 
Ever seeking, ever striving, 

Not for greed and not for gold. 

We have met along the pathway 

Many hardships, many cares; 
We have struggled to help others, 

Seeking always their burdens to share. 

Nearing the goal — ah, "Junior sisters," 

Looking ahead to another great year. 
Let us be braver, truer fighters; 

No time for sorrow, nor for a tear. 

Let us look back on our failures and victories, 
Leaving them there with only a word: 
'When we have fought and lost, it has been fair; 
When we have fought and won, we've played it square. 

Lift our old torch up to its highest; 

You hear the last call, "Carry on!" 
Our records may not all be the finest; 

There's room at the top; "Carry on!" 

— Sara Riggs, '29. 




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Maid of Athens 

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FRESHMAN CLASS 

OFFICERS 

LoRA Lee DeLoacii President 

Dixie Young Vice President 

WiLDA Jane Garrison" Secretary and Treasurer 





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FRESHMEN 


WlLMA AlLEX 


Elizabeth Berzett 


Marguerite Almon 


Mary Augusta Bibb 


Virginia Ball 


Virginia F. Caldwell 


Adelene Barnes 


Georgia Carter 


Brooksie Mae Bell 


Elizabeth Chambers 


Florine Bell 






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FRESHMEN 


Ruth Chunn 


Hazel Cornelius 


Margaret Clements 


Elizabeth Davis 


Gertrude Cleveland 


Bessie Mae Dawson 


Rose Coates 


Edna Eaves 


Faye Coates 


Dorothy Cooper 




Clara Copeland 




43 




Maid of Athens 



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FRESHMEN 


Margaret Ellis 


Grace Elizabeth Haley 


Beatrice Brown Frazer 


WiLMA Harlow 


Ruby Gowens 


Ruth Mae Hayes 


Opie Lee Gray 


Pauline Henderson 


Bertha Gregg 


Marion D. Hill 


Dorothy E. Hagoou 


Floy Haney 




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Maid of Athens 



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FRESHMEN 



\iRGiNiA Hinds 
Elizabeth Hobart 
Lucy Rivers Holmes 
Lillian McAllister 
JuANiTA Marie Johnson 
\iRcixiA Johnson 



Mary Turner Kelly 
Edethan London 
Gladys Glyn Jenkins 
Lena E. McGregor 
Myra Windsor Milford 
I LA Mae Hudson 




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Maid of Athens 



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FRESHMEN 


Jane Perry Nicholls 


\ioLA Prince 


Inez Mabel Oden 


Rowena Reid 


Betty Pass 


Mary Rudisell 


Adelle Polytixsky 


Barbara Sarver 


Mildred Pott 


Jessie Mae Sandlin 


Margaret Pride 






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FRESHMEN 



Catherine Margaret Scott Li la Tays 

Louise Seibold Esther Loventrice Turner 

Mary Lou Sentell Mildred Turner 

Minnie C. Sides Helen Margaret Yarbrough 

Christine Spearman Grace Roberts 

Mary Ellis Spotts Gladys E. Officer 




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SPECIAL STUDENTS 



Mary Ellen Hexders 
Katherine Ivey Moore 



Mary Yarbrough 
Gracia Sanderson 




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ORGANIZATIONS 



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STUDENT 


COUNCIL 




. President 




LOUNETTE 








Marguerite P 


lEEVES 








\'ice President 




BAN McCoy . 










. Secreta 


ry 


Mary Scott 










Treasurer 




LoRA Lee 


DeLoacii 




Freshman 


R( 


:presentative 






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MAID OF ATHENS STAFF 



Eunice Murphy 
Marguerite Reeves 



Julia Lovin 
"D'Jot" Streater . 
Emily Neville . 
Elise Hall 
Nan Jones 
Mildred Caldwell 
Louise Hummel 
Charlyn Godbey 
Evelyn Waldrop 

Mary Elizabeth Rutledge 
Florence Moore 
Dorothy Hagood 
Jean Morris 

Elizabeth Morelock . 
Louise White 

Annie Beadle Sanders 



Editor in Chief 

Business Manager 

. Assistant Editor 
Assistant Business Manager 

Sophomore Editor 

Junior Editor 

Sport Editor 
Sport Editor 
Art Editor 
. Art Editor 
Calendar of Events Editor 

Joke Editor 

Organizations Editor 
Freshman Editor 
. Poetry Editor 
. Rivers Academy Representative 
Rivers Academj' Representative 
. Senior Editor 




50 



Maid of Athens 



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Maid of Athens 



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THE CROW'S NEST STAFF 



Mabel Claire Orr . 
Mary Scott .... 

Annie Wade Street 
Margaret Ross . 
Elise Hall 
Sarah Riggs .... 
Charlyn Godbey . 

Effie Osley 

Mariebeth Tatum 
Dorothy Lane Rutland 
Jean Morris .... 
Myra Milford 

Ruby Jane Graham 
Cherie Giers 
Oni Allgood 

Mary Turner Kelly 



Editor 

. Business Manager 

Assistant Editor 

Advertising Manager 

Religious Activities Editor 

Social Editor 

Jokes Editor 

Sports Editor 

Senior Class Reporter 
Junior Class Reporter 
Sophomore Class Reporter 
Freshman Class Reporter 
Exchange Manager 
Rivers Academy Reporter 
. Circulation Manager 
.\.<sistant Circulation Manager 




;nMiiii.:^[iinimicbiiiniiiir.biimii[i 

52 



Maid of Athens 



iiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiri.inimfiiiiiiiiiiipiniiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiirhmmiiiiiiiiiim 





53 



Maid of Athens 



' l lllTll lH li ni lMllrl.il I I lllimill II lllrlnllllllimnillllllrlnlllllllM l i n i l II I 





Y. W. C. A. CABINET 



Julia Lovin 
Elise Hall 
Ethel Cooke 
Tempie Wynn 
Mary Elizabeth Rutledgk 
Janie Ragan .... 
Jean Morris 
Elizabeth Bell 
Sara Gay . . 
Mabel Orr 

Lounette Faust 



President 

\ ice President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Undergraduate Representative 

Chairman of Program Committee 

- Chairman of Publicity Committee 

Chairman of Social Committee 
Chairman of Music Committee 
. Chaiiman of Social Service Committee 
Chairman of World Fellowship Committee 




54 



Maid of Athens 




llimillll'llllrlnlllllllMllllllllllrlnllllllllllll rinl 1 1 ! I I I 1 I I I ITTTTTTTr 




HOME ECONOMICS CLUB 



OFFICERS 



LouNETTE Faust . 
Edith Tays .... 
Tressie Sims .... 

Miss Jessie Carr Bourne 



. President 
\'ice President 
Secretary-Treasurer 
Sponsor 



MEMBERS 



Marguerite Almon 
Bertha Barker 
Bessie Barker 
Georgia Carter 
Elizabeth Chambers 
Gertrude Cleveland 
Edith Dunaway 
Edna Eaves 
LuTiE Mae Eastep 
Elizabeth Fason 
IvALEE Faust 
Lounette Faust 



Beatrice Frazer 
Ruby Gowens 
Ivelle Hamilton 
Floy Haney' 
Wilma Harlow 
Pauline Henderson 
V irginia Hinds 
Lucy Rivers Holmes 
Mae Hudson 
Bettie Lou Horton 
Gladys Hughey 
Jewel Hulgan 



Virginia Johnson 
Annie Mason 
Nan McLellan 
Elsie Lee McKensie 
Helen Nabors 
Inez Oden 
Effie Ozley 
Rowena Reid 
Grace Roberts 
Louise Seibold 
Mary Lou Sentell 



Catherine Scott 
Mary Scott 
Verda Sims 
Tressie Sims 
Mariebetii Tatum 
Edith Tays 
Li la Tays 

LoVENTRICE TlRNEK 

Tempie VVy'nn 
Julia Totherow 
Viola Prince 




Triiii[idbfiiniiMicbi[iiiiiiiri.imnrtr 



55 



Maid of Athens 



' i iiirii i ii i i i ii nnirhimiiiniiiiiiiiiiriniiiiiiiiiimiiiiiirMiiinii i i iiiiiii i ' 





PHI SIGMA LITERARY SOCIETY 



OFFICERS 



Sarah Riggs 
E^fILY Neville . 
Julia Totherow . 
Elizabeth Davis 
ToMv Lou Le\ie 

Miss Lau.ja Davi, 

VVilma Allen 
Marguerite Almon 
Martha Ayres 
Cleo Barber 
Adelene Barnes 
Elizabeth Bell 
Florime Bell 
Lucy H. Binford 
Marguerite Briggs 
Mildred Caldwell 
Hazel Cornelius 
Elizabeth Chambers 
Ethel Cooke 
Dorothy Cooper 
Nena Joe Cantrell 
Mary Ellen Henders 
Pauline Cagle 
Lora Lee DeLoach 



ME 

F^DITH Dl'NAXVAY 

Elizabeth Davis 
Li'ciLE Darby 
Elizabeth Darby 
P'lizabeth Kason 
Ruby Jane Graham 
Ruth Hayes 
Gladys Hughey 
Floy Haney 
Wii.MA Harlow 
\ iRGiNiA Hinds 
I LA Mae Hudson 
Jewel Hulgan 
Louise Hummel 
Gladys Jenkins 
Virginia Johnson 
Iuanita Johnson 
Nan Iones 



MBERS 

'I'oMY Lou Levie 
Julia Lovin 
Jean Morris 
Katherine Moore 
Florence Moore 
Nan McLellan 
Jean McCoy 
Helen Nabors 
Ella Mae Neill 
Emily Neville 
Inez Oden 
Sarah Orman 
Mabel Orr 
Viola Prince 
Mildred Pott 
Janie Ragan 
VVilma Rice 



. President 
V ice President 

. Secretary 
Treasurer 
Sergeant-at-Arms 
Sponsor 

Grace Roberts 
NL\rgaret Ross 
Sarah Riggs 
Jessie Mae Sandlin 
Christine Spearman 
Catherine Scott 
Louise Seibold 
Minnie C. Sides 
Evelyn Swift 
Mariebeth Tatum 
Julia Totherow 
Mildred Turner 
Evelyn Waldrop 
Pauline Wood 
Birtie Lee Woddrooe 
Tempie Wynn 
Ruth ^Vhtng 




'iniiiiidaiiiniiiiicLiiiiiiMir^dlliimi' 



56 



Maid of Athens 




iiiiniiiiiiniirMiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiriniiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiriniimiiimiTTTTmf 




SIGMA DELTA LITERARY SOCIETY 



Dorothy Rvtland 
Annie Wade Street 
Elsie Lee McKensie . 

Miss Alice Heap 



Oni Allgood 
Mary A. Bibb 
Elizabeth Berzett 
Dorothy Bexagh 
Brooksie Bell 
Virginia Ball 
Alma Bullington 
Clara Copeland 
Gertrude Cleveland 
Ruth Chunn 
Virginia Caldwell 
Rose Coates 
Faye Coates 
Margaret Clements 
Bessie Mae Dawson 
Edna Eaves 
Margaret Ellis 
Lutie Mae Eastep 
IvALEE Faust 
LouNETTE Faust 



OFFICERS 



MEMBERS 



I.ORENE Freeman 
Rebecca Fennel 
Jane Garrison 
Bertha Gregg 
Sara Gay 
Charlyn Godbey 
Memorie G. Holt 
Marion Hill 
Pauline Henderson 
IvELLE Hamilton 
Elise Hall 
Dorothy Hagood 
Elizabeth Hobart 
Corona Hargrove 
Lucy Rivers Holmes 
Margie Ikard 
Mary Turner Kelly 
Edethen London 
Eunice Murphy 
Annie Mason 



Myra Milford 
Mary Morelock 
Mary Madry 
Lena McGregor 
Lillian McAllister 
Emalice McWilliams 
Jane Nichols 
Elsie Lee McKensie 
Gladys Officer 
Effie Ozley 
Margaret Pride 
Betty Pass 
Ethel Phillips 
RowENA Reid 
Evelyn Richards 
Margaret Reeves 
Dorothy L. Rutland 
.Mary Rudisill 
Mary E. Rutledge 
Tressie Sims 




President 
\ ice President 
. Secretary 
Sponsor 



Verda Sims 
Mary Ellis Spotts 
Mary Lou Sentell 
Annie Wade Street 
"D'Jot" Streater 
Mary Scott 
Barbara Sarver 
LiLA Wray Sloan 
Annie B. Sanders 
Edith Tays 
Li la Tays 

LovENTRicE Turner 
Erma Webb 
Mabel Wilcoxson 
Margaret Y. Wall 
Willa White 
Dixie Young 
Frances Yarbrough 
Helen Yarbrough 



;rTriiHidb[iiniiiiid3iiiiiiiiiri3iiimrn; 



57 



Maid of Athens 



'jiiiimiiimmmriniiiiiiiiiiimiiiiirhiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiriniiiiiiiiiimiiiii; 





THE OPERA BOXERS 



OFFICERS 

Jean McCoy President 

Sara Gay Vice President 

Oni Allgood . . . Treasurer 

Jean Morris Secretary 

IvELLE Hamilton Librarian 

Nan Jones Business Manager 

Miss Frances LeDoyt Yearley' Director 



MEMBERS 



Oni Allgood 
Cleo Barber 
Marguerite Briggs 
Pauline Cagle 
Mildred Caldwell 
Virginia Caldwell 
Ethel Cooke 
Clara Copeland 
Ruth Chunn 
Lounette Faust 



Ruth Elliott 
Jane Garrison 
Sara Gay 
Charlyn Godbey 
Dorothy Hagood 
Grace Haley 
Memorie Gray Holt 
Louise Hummel 
IvELLE Hamilton 
Lucy Rivers Holm us 



Elizabeth Morelock 
Sarah Orman 
Marguerite Reeves 
WiLMA Rice 
Clara Mae Riley 
Dorothy L'. Rutland 
Catherine Scott 
Mary' Scott 
Gracia Sanderson 
Tri:ssik Sims 



Mariebeth Tatum 
Louise White 
Mabel Wilcoxson 
Erma Webb 
Janie Ragan 
Margaret Pride 
Lillian McAllister 
Annie Wade Street 
Lora Lee DeLoach 
Ruby Gowens 




.'i[iiii[idb[iiniiiiici.iiiiiiiiir[iimiim ' 

58 



Maid of Athens 



IIIII'llllllllllllrMlllllin 



iirNiimiiii 






' ' 'Hi 




DRAMATIC CLUB 





OFFICERS 




Kmily Xevii.lk 




I'rcsidcnl 


Ruby Jane Graham 




\ ice President 


Evelyn Waldrop 




. Secretary 


Rebekah Fenneli, , 




I reasurer 


Miss Haitie Mae Pakker 


MEMBERS 


Director 


Opie Lee Gray 


^L\RY RUUISILL 


.\L\RGUERiTE Reeves 


Oni Allgood 


XLabel Orr 


Evelyn Richards 


Wilda Jane Garrison 


Hazel Cornelius 


Margie Ikard 


Evelyn Waldrop 


Adelene Barnes 


Mary Turner Kelly 


Isabelle Simmons 


Pauline Woods 


Elise Hall 


"D'Iot" Streater 


\'erda Sims 


Ruby Jane Graham 


Lora Lee DeLoach 


Virginia Caldwell 


Elizabeth Malone 


Mariebeth Tatum 


Bessie Mae Dawson 


Adelle Polytinskv 


Jimmy Fay Whitley 


Rebekah Fennell 


Nena Joe Cantrell 


Emily Neville 


Margaret Pride 






;imillldj||iniliiid.iiiiiiiiiri.iiimrn; 

59 



Maid of Athens 



lllinimilllll Mllrhlllllllllllllllllllrlnllllllllimillllllrlnimini llllllltll 





ORCHESTRA 



Mrs. M. E. Beckett 
Erma Webb . 



Conductor 
Pianist 



Sara Gay 

Cl.ARA COPELAND 

Mabel Wilcoxson 
Pauline Wood 



OFFICERS 



MEMBERS 



College Orchestra 

Rosalind Boggs 
Clara Copeland 
Mildred Caldwell 
Rowena Reid 
Pauline Wood 
Evelyn McDonald 
Julia Lovin 
Harry Allen 
Carl Richter 
Pauline Walker 
Jimmie McCoy 
Ross Starkey 



Rhythmic Orchestra 

Sarah Orman 
Gracia Sanderson 
Ruth Elliot 
Mary Nelle Smith 
Jane Garrison 
Virginia Caldwell 
Mabel Wheeler 
Clara Mae Riley 
Minnie C. Sides 
Mary Yarbrough 
\\ iLMA Rice 
I.oRENE Freeman 




;fTniiiidb[iiniinicbiimiiiid.iiinirir 

60 



. President 
\ ice President 
. Secretary 
Treasurer 



Maid of Athens 



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iidjiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiii 




APOLLO ART CLUB 



OFFICERS 



Charlyn Godbey 
Jane Nichols 
Clara Copeland . 
Marion Hill 

Mrs. E. K. Turner 



. President 
Vice President 
Secretary and Treasurer 
Reporter 
Sponsor 



Martha Ayres 
Cleo Barber 
Elizabeth Bell 
Pauline Cagle 
Mildred Caldwell 
Ivalee Faust 
LouNETTE Faust 
Rebekah Fennell 
Louise Hummel 
Florence Moore 



MEMBERS 

Marguerite Reeves 
Evelyn Richards 
Lila Wray Sloan 
Evelyn Waldrop 
Frances Yarbrough 
Ruth Chew 
Audrey Beason 
Clara Copeland 
Mattie Davison 
Charly'n Godbey 



Marion Hill 
Jean McCoy 
Jane Nichols 
Elizabeth Salmons 
Mildred Potts 
Mariebeth Tatum 
LoRA Lee DeLoach 
Mildred Turner 
Irene Patten 
Mrs. Yearwood 




61 



Maid of Athens 



' i i n T ni iiiiiiri tiiinhiiiiiiiimiimiiiriniiiiiiiiiimiimiriniiiiiiiiiinTTTTTT; 





LATIN CLUB 



OFFICERS 



Dorothy Bexagu 




President 


Ethel Phillips 




Vice PresideiU 


Annie Beadles Sanders 




. Secretary' 


Barbara Sarver 




Treasurer 


Miss Laura Davis 


MEMBERS 


Sponsor 


Oni Allgood 
Martha Ayres 
Elizabeth Bell 
Dorothy Benaugh 


Memorie Gray Molt 
Louise Hummel 
Marion Hill 
ToMY Lou Levie 


Ethel Phillips 
Annie B. Sanders 
Barbara Sarver 
Minnie C. Sides 


Elizabeth Berzett 
Lucy H. Bin ford 
Marguerite Briggs 
Pauline Cagle 


Julia Lovin 
Jean McCoy 
Emalice McWilliams 
Florence Moore 


^L\RGUERITE Reeves 
Margaret Ross 
Mariebeth Tatum 
Mildred Turner 


Ruth Chew 
LuciLE Darby 
LoRA Lee DeLoach 
Sara Gay 


Eunice Murphy 
Ella Mae Neill 
Emily Neville 


Margaret \ oung Wall 
Ruth Young 
Mary Rudisill 




)riiiinLb(iiniiiiiLbi[iiiiiiir.^Lllimi| ' 

G2 



Maid of Athens 



■miiHiJiiiiiiiii^.iiii]rTriimiiiiiirininiiiiii!imiiniri^mMii!immMiii 





SPANISH CLUB 



OFFICERS 

Elsie Lee McKensik President 

Rebekah Fenxell . . Vice President 

Margaret Ross ... Secretary and Treasurer 

Aliss LiuRA Davis Sponsor 



Oni Allcood V Freeman 
Cleo Barber v Howell 
Margaret Clements y .\chey 
Virginia Caldwell y Dye 
Faye Coates y Novelle 
Rose Coates y Novelle 
Clara Copeland v Hh.derbrano 
Rebekah Fennell y Hicdon 
Gladys Jenkins y Pitchford 
Mary Turner Kelly y Phillips 
Mary Madry y Elkins 
Jean McCoy y Moore 
Lena McGregor y Johnson 
Florence Moore y Ivey 
Mary Morelock y Murphy 
Janie Ragan y Binford 
Wilma Rice y Howard 
Sarah Riggs y Taylor 
Grace Roberts y Wesson 



MEMBERS 

Mary Rudisill y Fendley 

Dorothy Rutland y Mahan 

Minnie Sides y Foster 

Annie Wade Street y McKissack 

Mary F.llis Spotts y Shelton 

Julia Totherow y Pettus 

Helen Yarbrough y Evans 

Mabel Orr y Taylor 

Evelyn Waldrop y Williamson 

"D'Jot" Streater y Gargis 

Mildred Caldwell y Poor 

Eunice Murphy y Copeland 

Julia Lovin y Witty 

Evelyn Richards y Brock 

Dorothy Benagh 

Lucy H. Binford y Donnell 

Emalice McWilliams y Cole 

M. V. Wall y Griffis 



Nan Jones 

Elizabeth Bell 

Florene Bell 

Ivalee Faust 

Elsie Lee McKensie 

Edith Tays 

Elizabeth Davis 

Bessie Mae Dawson 

Lorene Freeman 

Jane Garrison 

Mildred Pott 

Margaret Ross y Woodward 

Barbara Sarver y Spain 

Christine Spearman 

Erma Webb 

Mabel Wilcoxson 

Pauline Wood 




KniniLbiiiniiiiidaiiiiiiiiicbiiiMirn; 



63 




Maid of Athens 



)l l Ml l l ll l li milllrl-.llllllllMlllllllllrlnlllllllllimilllllrlnllllllll l l l M i n 









LA CERCLE FRANCAIS 



OFFICERS 

Eunice Mukphv ... President 

Ethel Phillips \'icc President 

Marguerite Briggs Treasurer 

Sara Gay Secietary 

Miss Kathkuine V. Peebles Sponsor 

MEMBERS 

WiLMA Allen M.vzel Cornkiils M.\r\ M.\ukv .Annil H. Sanders 

Oni Allgood Lora Lee DeLoach Annii: Mason I^arbara Sarver 

Martha Ayres Margaret Ellis Florence Moore M.\rv Scott 

Cleo Barber I.orene Freeman Mary Morelock \'eri)a Sims 

Bessie Barker Ruby Jane Graham Jean Morris Christine Spearman 

Adelene Barnes Opik Lee Cray Ki.i.a Mae Weill Mary F.i.i.is Spotts 

Brooksie M. Bell Dorothy Hagood Family Neville "D'Jot" Strfater 

Elizabeth Bell Grace Haley Jane Nichols Annie Wade Street 

Elizabeth Berzett Ivelle Hamilton Betty Pass Mariebeth Tatum 

Mary Augusta Bibb Ruth Hayes Adele Polytinsky Julia Totherow 

Alma Bullington Marion Hill Margaret Pr-de Frma Webb 

Pauline Cagle Memorif Gray Holt Janie Ragan Willa White 

Nena Joe Cantrell Louise Hummel Rovvena Reid Mabel Wilcoxson 

Ruth Chew Margie Ikard Sarah Riggs Birth: Lee WnnnRooi- 

Ruth Chunn Nan Allen Jones Wilma Rice Helen Yarbrough 

Ethel Cooke Iuanita Johnson Margaret Ross Dixie Young 

Dorothy Cooi-er Tomy Lou Levie Mary Rudisill Ruth Vot-NC 
Mary Ellfn Cole 




;[r[miiLbiiiniimLbiiii!ii!id.[iiiiirn; 

6 4 



Maid of Athens 




llll'lilllimilrlnlllllllMIMIIIIIIIrhlllllllimilllllllrJ^mmilllllTTTTTTTT 




BIRMINGHAM CLUB 



OFFICERS 



Marguerite Briggs 




President 


4ary Ellis Spotts . 




Vice President 


ouisE White ... - 




Secretary and Treasurer 


Miss Hattie Mae Parker 


MEMBERS 


Sponsor 


Katiierine White 


Mary Elizabeth Rutlkdge 


Nena Joe Cantrell 


Clara Mae Riley 


Charlyn Godbey 


Sarah Riggs 


Mabel Claire Orr 


Marguerite Reeves 


Eunice Murphy 


Josephine Brock 


Ci.EO Barber 


I5eatrice Frazer 


Rosamond Harllee 








;rr[iii!iLi3[iiniiiiicLiiiiiiiiirbi[imrn; 

65 



Maid of Athens 

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T SQUARE CLUB 



OFFICERS 



FACULTY 



Mary Morei.ock President 

Frances Huffman Vice President 

Virginia Caldweli Secretary and Treasurer 

Jane CjArrison Reporter 



Josephine Stone. _ 
Jessie Bourne. . 

Alice Heap 

Ruth Lassiter. . 
Frances L. Yeari.\ 



-Columbia, Tcnn. 
- Nashville. Tenn. 
_ Knoxvillc, Tcnn. 
_ Nas'iville, Tenn. 
Galcsburg, III. 



MEMBERS 



Martha Ayres Spring Hill, Tenn. 

Frankie Brown Murfreesboro, Tenn. 

Cjladys Hughey _Elkton, Tenn. 

Elizabeth Morelock Nashville, Tenn. 

Mary Morlock Nashville, Tenn. 

France.^ Huffman Shelby vi lie, Tenn. 

Juliet Cannon Murfreesboro, Tenn. 



Frances Salmons Nashville, Tenn . 

Betsy Salmons. ._, Nashville, Tcnn. 

Jane Garrison -.Gallatin, Tenn. 

Katherine Allb right Gallatin, Tcnn. 

Virginia Caldwell Westmoreland, Tenn. 

Ruth Elliot Salisbury, Tcnn. 

WiLLA White Ardmore, Tcnn. 




;frninid.iiiniiiiiLbiiiiiiiiirbiiiMinr 

66 



Maid of Athens 



'iiiiiiiiJiiiiimiriTiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiirhiiiiimmiiiiiMirhmiiiiii miiniMi' 





HUNTSVILLE CLUB 





OFFICERS 




Mildred Caldwell 




President 


ixiE Young 




Vice President 


Annie Wade Street . 








OTHER MEMBERS 




Brooksie Mae Bell 


Lucy Rivers Holmes 


Lillian McAllister 


Clara Copeland 


Louise Hummel 


Myra Milford 




;iniiiiidbiiiniiMid.iiiiiiiiiriiJi[iim; ' 




Maid of Athens 



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LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE CLUB 



OFFICERS 



Nan Jones 
Mary Ellen Renders 
Katherine Moore 

Miss Mary Hunt 



. President 
Vice President 
Secretary and Treasurer 
Sponsor 



MEMBERS 



Lora Lee DeLoacii 
IvELLE Hamilton 
Mary Ellen Henders . 
Nan Jones 
Florence Moore 
Katherine Moore . 
Mildred Pott . . . . 
Edith Tays .... 
LiLA Tays . . . . 
Mildred Turner 
Jimmy Fay Whitley 
Miss Mary Hunt 



Atlanta, Georgia 
New Albany, Mississippi 

. Miami, Florida 

Marfa, Texas 
Hopewell, Virginia 
Hopewell, Virginia 
. Waynesboro, Louisiana 
. Booneville, Mississippi 
. Booneville, Mississippi 
Atlanta, Georgia 
. Boone\ille, .Mississippi 
Cooper, Texas 




;n[iiiMLbniniiiiid3iiiiiiiiid.iMnirir 

68 




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ACT III 



ATHLETICS 



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Maid of Athens 



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ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



Effie Ozley . 
Eunice Murphy 
"D'Jot" Streater 

Miss Hattie Mae Parker 



OFFICERS 



. President 
Vice President 
Secretary and Treasurer 
Director 




,'niiiiii&biiii]iiiiici.iiiiiiiiiriiiiiimi;' 



69 



Maid of Athens 



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CHEER LEADERS 



"Peggy" Reeves 
Sara Gay 



Mabel Ann Farrington 
Jean Morris 



"Jot" Streater 
Mary Rudisill 




70 



Maid of Athens 



'iiniiiniiiiiiiiiriniiniii MiiiiiiiiiipiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiridiiiiiiirMMiniiii' 





Nan Jones 
Miss Hattie Mae Parker 
Miss Mary C. Pittman 



Effie Ozley 
Mary Scott 



THE "A" CLUB 



OFFICERS 



MEMBERS 

Oni Allgood 

AIary' Ellen Renders 



. President 
Physical Director 
Sponsor 



Eunice Murphy 
Mabel Wilcoxson 




;rniiiiiLbnin!mid3iiiiiiiiirbiiininr 

71 



Maid of Athens 



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■'''. -y^^^^^: ' - '7Mtf^^/.! 





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72 



Maid of Athens 

)lllllilJlllllilllcLlll]IIIMIIIIIIIIIIrhlllllllllllMIIIMIrlnllllMIIILiiLim^' 

WE'RE IN THE CAVALRY NOW! 




] v-g- ES. we are seasoned troopers. One day near the first of October we were calmly enjoying lunch. 
I ^F when, after a heavy knock on the table. Miss Parker arose and made this announcement: "Good 
L„^- news, trirls ! Mrs. McCoy has arranp:ed with Captain French for you to enjoy the preat sport of 
Bnsin horseback riding this year. Ten of you can ko at once. How many of you want to go this after- 
noon?" She sat down amid a storm of applause. 

Everybody wanted to po that afternoon, but we had to await our turn. Every afternoon (except Sun- 
day) Captain French and the Sergeant brought out ten horses, and there were always riders waiting to 
take the horses. We each asked the Captain, "Which horse must I ride ?" and. indicating a certain 
horse. "Is this a good one?" We always received the same reply: "They are all good. I don't bring any 
out here but the good ones." After a few weeks. Miss Parker gava one of her student assistants charge 
of the horseback riding. Still the riding fever raged, despite the fact that novices stiffly dismounted and 
declared that they would never again ride a cavalry horse, because they have only three gaits, and walk- 
ing is too slow, trotting is too jolting, and galloping is too fast. It was really delightful galloping out the 
Wellswood Road or out one of the highways and cutting through neck^ of woods. Riding two and two 
where the road was wide enough, we felt very soldierly, even though the formation was not always regu- 
lar. Then riding as troopers (single file) through the brilliant autumn woods as the sun was sinking 
in the West, or splashing through the little streams, gave us the thrill of adventure and romance. 

November came, with colder weather and approaching winter. The interest in riding paled a little 
as allowances grew low, and the assistant could hardly find riders for the horses. So a club was formed 
of those who wished to ride regularly, and a party of ten went twice a week, Monday and Wednesday after- 
noons. It was after one of these rides that one of the crowned heads of Europe came on our campus in 
the person of Miss Heap. I can still hear her saying : "Whoa, Cannon : whoa !" But Cannon kept on 
galloping. When Captain French raced up and stopped him suddenly, our "Prince of Wales" took her 
tumble over Cannon's head. Fortunately she was not hurt, or even frightened, and she gamely remounted. 
The next week and those following she rode Cannon again. 

One of these November afternoons seven of the girls were startled to see Captain French hastily give 
Hal a sharp kick and speedily disappear down the- road for no apparent reason. But the reason was, as 
the girls discovered when they gained the top of the hill, three certain young ladies who were exceptionally 
fond of riding fast were far out of sight. Even though these three were the best horsewomen in school. 
Captain French had become worried, because they had been far ahead for some time, and deemed it neces- 
sary to pursue them. When he had overtaken them, he found that all was well and that they were just 
enjoying a little race. Nevertheless, he rebuked them severely, and they promised never to run ahead of 
the crowd again. 

December came, and thoughts of Christmas filled the girls and emptiness their purses. The twenty 
regular riders dwindled to ten. The horses came on Monday afternoons only. It was in this month that 
one of the girls, a regular rider, attempted to wrench from Miss Heap her title. On the first attempt 
the horse and rider disagreed suddenly as to which direction they would take ; so their ways parted. The 
rider, sensing her loss of etjuilibrium. jumped and landed lightly on all fours without even soiling her 
hands. The next week this pretender to the crown made her second attempt. She was riding Joe, the 
dearest horse of all, when he became frightened by a dog and bucked, literally pitching his rider from the 
saddle. The rider was totally unconscious that anything unusual had happened until she landed with a 
thud on the ground. Joe, who had been trotting, stopped and politely waited for his uninjured rider to 
remount. 

We all mourned the sale of — you know, the nag that reminded you of a steam roller. We rejoiced that 
riding captains. Murphy and Morris, settled the question as to who would ride Dynamite by agreeing to 
take turns the rest of the year. 

"Ride 'im. Cowboy!" Kelley. you staged a rodeo of your own that afternoon you so gallantly rode the 
colt, but the spectators did not enjoy it any more than you did. No, indeed ! But we admire your courage 
and horsemanship. 

Several of the girls became infected with the desire to learn to hurdle. If they saw a measuring worm 
in the road, they would attempt to hurdle it. They hurdled everything, from ditches to bales of hay, and 
they succeeded admirably. We have some budding "Buffalo Bills" among us. 

An eventful month was December. We were greatly grieved when we learned that riding Captain 
Caldwell had requested Captain French to discontinue bringing our noble steed, the big black horse, because 
every time he brought him there was an argument as to who would have the privilege of riding him. 

January came, bringing colder weather ; and it impossible to beg, bribe, or persuade enough girls to go 
riding to order the horses. So we did not even see a horse. 

February came and went as January did. 

The March wind was lenient, and allowed us one exhilarating ride. 

In the spring a college girl's fancy turns to thoughts of outdoor sports. Riding being first in our hearts, 
there was a demand for horses every time we went during the showery month of April. 

Then came the glorious month of May-^glorious in many ways. We went regularly once a week over 
the same roads and paths that we had traversed in the fall. Though everything presented a different 
aspect, nature was none the less beautiful. The green trees were peopled with birds of many colors and 
many songs. Where dry leaves had been, there were wild flowers. As we rode on those beautiful after- 
noons, we sang and talked — talked of many things. We talked of how we enjoyed riding this year and 
how much we appreciated this wonderful opportunity that had been given us. We spoke of what a suc- 
cessful riding year it had been, as every one had thoroughly enjoyed it and no one- had been hurt. Then 
we would lapse into silence; and as the May breeze stirred the leaves overhead. I would think of a little 
bit of a poem I learned several years ago : 

"Leaf again, life again, love again, song again — 
Yes, my wild little poet." 
To this I added: 

"And soon home again. 
Don't we know it !" 

Those who don't ride walk, and the roads and highways leading from Athens have taken their toll of 
college girls' shoe leather, because the hikers are many and the hikes frequent. 

— M. L. C, '30. 

73 




Maid of Athens 



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Above — Riding Club 



Below — Hiking Club 



RIDING CLUB CAPTAINS 



Mary-Ellen Henders 
Eunice Murphy 
Jean Morris 



Mildred Caldwell 
Effie Ozley 
Mary Scott 



Jean McCoy' 

JiMMiE Faye Whitley 

Rebekah Fennell 



HIKING CLUB CAPTAINS 



Elizabeth Bell 
Tempie Wynn 
Florence Moore 
Julia Totherow 



Gladys Hughey 
Lounette Faust 
Elise Hall 
Rebekah Fennell 



Edith Tays 

JiMMiE Fay Whitley 

Sara Gay' 

Elsie Lee McKenzie 



Janie Ragan 
WiLMA Rice 
Pauline Wood 
Ivalee Faust 




;ifiiiiiid.iiinimid3iiimiiiri.ii!n!nr 



74 



Maid of Athens 



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Above — Gymnasium Class 



Below — Tennis Club 




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SWIMMING CLUB 



Mildred Caldwei.i, 
Jean IMorris 
Mildred Turner 
Annie Wade Street 



THE LIFE GUARDS 

Captain Lena McGregor 
P'rankie Brown 
Grace Wai.drop 
Louise Sarver 



Mattie Davison 
Rosalind Boggs 
Elizabeth Morelock 




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ACT IV 


i FEATLRES i 




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ELECTIONS 



Long, long ago, when another Athens held sway in an- 
other land of learning, men believed that the gods selected 
certain ones to whom they gave care and blessing. We, 
too, believe that there are those among us who rather truly 
typify the ideals for which we all strive. Accordingly, the 
student body has elected the girls who appear in the fol- 
lowing pages to represent the college types of 1928. 

Not as the select creatures of far-off marble gods and 
goddesses, but as daughters of the living principles of 
beauty, wisdom, and sportsmanship, we present these our 
chosen types in the "Who's Who" of Athens College. 



77 




NAN ALLEN JONES 
BEAUTY 




JANE PERRY NICHOLS 

BEAUTY 




FLORENCE ARCHER MOORE 

BEAUTY 




MARGUERITE PHILLIPS BRIGGS 
BEAUTY 




MARIEBETH TATUM 

BEAUTY 





MARY ELLIS SPOTTS 

BEAUTY 




JiiJffiSaSS*'^" 



EDNA MARGUERITE REEVES 

MAY QUEEN 



Maid of Athens 



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85 



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GIRLS FROM EVERYWHERE 



Watch those Alabamians catch that L. and N., 
Bound for every corner of this State we're in, 
Each one with her hat box, pushing Georgians on. 
While the Virginians grumble and the Texans moan. 

There goes Mary Ellen from the "Sunshine State;" 
She's from dear ole Florida. "Run, you'll be too late!" 
Watch the pennants sparkle on the luggage there; 
Count "Ole Miss" among them, see her maidens fair. 

Big ones, skinny ones, tall ones, girls from everywhere. 
Girls from Colorado, dark-brown eyes and hair. 
Tennessee for musicians — can they catch the train? — 
Virginia grabs her hat box and calls to "Pokey" Jane. 

Well, they're almost baded, bound for Birmingham. 
"Pack those boxes closer, give that door a slam!" 

Every girl seems happy to be going home. 
"I wonder if we've missed one? Are there any yet to come?" 

"Wait there, Mr. Flagman; here're some more to go! 
Load up, Louisiana; don't be so awful slow!" 
The engine surges forward with its feminine avoirdupois. 

"Open the doors; stop that train; Boggs goes to Illinois!" 

Down the tracks, 'tis too late, the engine makes the bounds. 
And the college will be silent — no sweet, girlish sounds. 
But before the summer's over and September's here at last. 
They'll all be facing Athens, wishing vacation were past. 

— Sarah Riggs, '29. 




89 



Maid of Athens 

' i iiiTii i i ii i i ii iiiiirhi i n i mmi i m iii rhiiiiii i i i imiiiiiiriniiiiiiiiiim iiii i ; 
CALENDAR OF EVENTS 




September 
14. Opening exercises. "Hello! Howdy! Hey, everybody! What did you do this 



summer?" 

16. Y. W. C. A. reception. 

17. Real work. 

19. New students still coming. 

23. Faculty recital. 

29 to October 7. Spink, spank, spunk! Initiating the "Rats." Whoopie! 

October 
.5. Organization of the clubs. 

7. "Sophs" doctor Freshmen's ills with a camp-fire picnic. 
15. Mr. M. H. H. Joachim, from India, lectures. 

24. Faculty reception. 

28. Our first glimpse of Mrs. Chapman. (More later.) 
31. Sh! Hush! Spooks and goblins! Halloween! 

November 
9. Cherniavsky Trio, instrumentalists. 

25. Phi Sigma-Sigma Delta debate. 

26. Russian Cossack Chorus. 

29. Scout dance. 

December 
3. Inter-Society basketball game. 

7. Examinations. Our doom! Many new signs unknown to the faculty. 

8. "Once in a Blue Moon" — in Athens and in Huntsville, too. 

14. Rah, rah, rah! Basketball Team leaves for tour! 
17. Three Hi's for Santa Claus! 

18 to January 3. "Wonder where the gang is now?" 

January 

3. School again. "What did give you?" 

7. New Year's party. 
10. Polly's experiences while in Detroit. 

15. Guilty conscience? "Mr. Sullivan is unable to come to make pictures to-day. I 

hope none of us are responsible," announced Miss Pittman. 

20. Dr. Dorsey speaks. 

February 
13. Phi Signias entertain Sigma Deltas. 

17. Phi Sigmas win over the Sigma Deltas in debate. 

18. "Andy" Murphy requests that all faculty members please come dressed the fol- 

lowing day. 

25. Coyote Basketball Team wins over Auburn. 
24-26. Student Volunteers meet in Athens College. 

26. Tony Sarg Marionettes. 

March 
6. Late hours — not with a "date." "The.se awful exams!" 
13. Sudden change in schedule. 

15. Our second glimpse of the famous author, Mrs. Katherine Hopkins Chapman. 

16. Stunt Night. Faculty loses the cup to Dramatic Club. 
16-18. Other glimpses of the famous author. 

28. Earnest Hutcheson, pianist. 

30. Organ-Voice recital, given by Misses Sara Gay and Sarah Riggs. 

31. Miss Murphy announces in chapel: "Certain Staff officers and the faculty ad- 

visor(s) (?), Miss Pittman and I, have made the following nominations for 
the 'Who's Who' Section." Laughter. Wonder why? 

April 
1. Good night. Annual gone to press and Staff to bed. 



90 



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JOKES 




Virginia Caldwell: "They giggled when I sat down to the piano; but when I began to 
play the lessons I learned from the Sure Fire Correspondence School, they laughed out 
loud." 

Doctor: "Has there been any insanity in your family?" 
Mrs. Church: "Well, my husband thinks he's boss." 

Dr. Mackey walked up to a small negro boy who was sitting on the curb trying to eat 
an exceedingly large watermelon, but who was not making very much headway. 
"Too much watermelon, isn't there, Rastus?' he remarked. 
"Nossuh, boss," responded the small black boy — "not enough nigger." 

Miss Pittman: "Who fiddled when Rome burned?" 

Ruth Chunn: "Hector." 

Miss Pittman: "No." 

Ruth: "Towser." 

Miss Pittman: "Towser! What do you mean? It was Nero." 

Ruth: "Well, I knew it was samebody with a dog's name." 

CAMPUS ECHOES 

"Has the bell rung?" "Where's Miss Pittman?" 

"Is that the breakfast bell?" "Is the package list up yet?" 

"I haven't cracked the book." "Lets go ts town." 

"I know I passed — out." "What's on at the show?" 

"Did I get a special?" "Isn't Dorothy Lane through eating yet?" 

"Martha, look in my box." "Is Cleo going to open the store?" 

"What are we going to have for dessert?" "Let's dance at the gym." 

"Save your forks for pie." 

"Will the following girls please report to my office ?" 

Sara: "Pego's bet me fifty cents she'd have a date with a football man." 

Dorothy: "Well, did she?" 

Sara: "Yes, and she gets the half back." 

Miss Pittman: "Who was Homer?" 

"Jot:" "Homer ain't a 'who.' It's the 'what' that made Babe Ruth famous." 

Professor Goodrich: "The window should be opened. [Louder] Miss McWillians, 
will you open it?" 

Eacie (waking up) : "I'll open it for four bits." 

Elsie Lee: "Mabel says she thinks I'm a wit." 
Mag: "Well, she's half right." 

Mary M.: "Why did Mr. Cooke fire Mabel?" 

Andy: "He sent her for a list of all the men of note in town, and she came back with 
a list of musicians." 

Mariebeth stood on the railroad track; the train was coming fast; 
The train got off the railroad track to let Miss Tatum pass. 

Dell: "What's the difference between a mouse and a co-ed?" 

Mary Turner : "One harms the cheese, and the other charms the he's." 

PROVERBS 

Love is like death. It either means heaven or competition. 
Pretty girls are rushed incessantly; others have hope chests. 

The hope chest — a relic of the days when a man married for a wife; when marriage 
was an institution, not a destitution. 




.iniiiMd.[iiniii iid. i i i i ii Miri^^lilllim ' 

95 



Maid of Athens 



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THINGS WE ARE NOT SURPRISED AT 



Peg-gy's daily letter from "Doug." 

"Birdie" Hamilton having' indigestion. 

Lora Lee hailing Mr. Cooke. 

To meet Martha Ayres at the P. O. 

"Wallace's" invitation to basketball banquet. 

The Kappa Sig emblems on the campus. 

Mrs. Beckett announces orchestra practice. 

The Beauties looking beautiful. 

Miss Parker's frequent visits to Birmingham. 

Sara's special from "Barney." 



Miss Werneke's "endearing terms." 

Prunes for lunch. 

No hot water on Saturday nights. 

Grits for breakfast. 

Lila Wray's car refusing to be cranked. 

Beans for dinner. 

Dr. Boggs has adopted a "Son" (?). 

The faculty six on a party. 

"Rat" Hill winning the short-story prize. 

Mary Ellis hungry. 



THINGS THAT SURPRISE US 

Elsie Hall getting peeved. 

Memorie Gray Holt passed in French III. 

Professor Cooke settling down. 

Grace Haley closed a door when leaving a room. 

Mariebeth with her hair up at breakfast. 

Mildred Caldwell was ready to leave the table with the rest. 

"Mag" Briggs reducing. 

"The Prince of Wales" still likes to ride horseback. 

"Becea" Fennel in a hurry. 

"Mamma" can endure separation from her "children." 

Dorothy Lane in a red dress. 

Sophomores let the co-eds make the highest grade in English. 

Professor Goodrich speaking in a soft voice. 

"Three" Seniors think they can patronize drug stores at night. 

Margaret Young Wall getting a "permanent." 

Mabel Orr taking a holiday. 

Myra's physical condition permitting breakfast at 7 o'clock. 

The Senior Class off their dignity. 

Dr. Mackey's interpretation of "The Most Modern Girl." 

Faye Coates arrived at class on time. 

"Red" Richard's knowledge of operations. 

That Emily Neville likes Wordsworth's "Ode on Intimations of Immorality. 



JOKES 



Lives of Seniors all remind us 
That they have not lived in vain; 

For although they're going to leave us, 
Their notebooks will still remain. 

Miss Werneke: "What are pauses?" 
"Bo": "They grow on cats." 

Clara: "He looked terribly silly when 
he proposed to me." 

Virginia : "No wonder. Look at the 
silly thing he was doing!" 

When Cupid hits the mark, he usually 
Mrs. it. 



Noah was so opposed to gambling that 
he sat on the deck all day. 

Miss Bourne: "What makes your room- 
mate look so sad?" 

Mary M.: "Well, she believes that ig- 
norance is bliss, and she is trying to imi- 
tate a wise guy." 

Sara Gay: "What would you give for 
a voice like mine?" 

Miss Yearly: "Chloroform." 

Nan: "Mag looks like a million tonite." 
Jean: "I know, but she's only nine- 
teen." 




;frMiiiid.[m]imicbiiii!iiiid.ii[nmi 

96 



Maid of Athens 

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DOWNFALL 




fi 



EOPLE wondered — at least, people who had come to shady old Argenta in the past 
^^^ thirty years wondered. Some of the old people in the town understood why the 
»OB!d old Grosser house, back in the cedars, was so still, so gloomy, that even Betty 
Grosser, gay little eighteen-year-old butterfly that she was, could nit liven it 
up, and always sought her pleasures away from home. Those graybeards knew the 
tragedy in the Grosser family, and the reason for the strange friendship between Betty's 
dignified old father and the taciturn, soured man who, as James Sawyer, had eked out 
a spiall living there for years by practicing law. 

Yes, there was certainly something spooky ab^ut that old house. School girls were 
inclined to run past, giggling at their own foolish fears, or else cross to the other side 
of the street, saying that it made them feel creepy. It was a very respectable brick 
house, of no particular style, but in keeping with Mr. Henry Grosser's high place in the 
community. The hedges looked moth-eaten, though, and the whole place had an air of 
sadness; even the shutters sagged on their hinges and the ivy drooped around the door 
as though it were trying to hide something within. 

Betty hated the place, especially since her mother had died five years before. When 
questioned why she seemed to abhor it S3, she said: "O, I don't know. It's just so gloomy 
and" — she laughed nervously — "but you couldn't budge dad out of the place with dyna- 
mite. He's absolutely as fixed there as that old iron dog that's waiting for his master's 
return." The truth was that Betty knew that there was something that preyed on her 
father's mind that he would not tell her, and because she loved him so she was wor- 
ried. Of course she knew that her mother's death and the long decline that preceded it 
had broken him, and she had vaguely resented that mood in him, and somehow felt, 
young as she was when it happened, that it had been the cause of her mother's death. 
The whole atmosphere was so opposed to her mother's happy, loving, care-free nature 
that, after years of trying to dispel the gloom and throw sunlight into the darkened 
rooms of the old house and of her husband's heart, she had given up the task. But 
she had never complained; and when she died, she only looked into Betty's eyes and 
said: "Remember that I love you always, and do try to make daddy happy." 

She was gone, and now there was only Betty to bring sunshine, though there was 
hardly any one better suited to do just that — Betty, who had always loved laughter, 
pretty clothes, parties. And now jazz, dancing, and fast automobiles she loved, with 
now and then a cigarette "to settle her nerves," or a drink "for excitement," as she 
said, though she really did it because "all the I'est of the crowd were doing it." The 
boys termed her a "darn good sport," admiring her skill in driving seventy-five miles 
an hour and efl'ectively dodging everything — of course, not counting chickens, and pigs, 
and such things that will get in the way. And then they fell in love with her beauty 
and charming ways. The girls said that she was "adorable," and "perfectly precious," 
and so on, and wondered how much she paid for her clothes. They sometimes became 
furiously jealous of her over Sam, or Bill, or some one else, but always forgave her and 
proceeded to invite her to the nexti luncheon, because, like flowers and decorations, she 
was needed to grace the scene, and then one really couldn't stay mad at a girl like Betty. 

One night Betty came in earlier than usual. She flung her fur coat across the bed 
and fell on top of it, her fists clenched. She felt that she had come to the crisis, and 
there was no one to turn to. She was tired, tired — tired of parties, tired of running, 
chasing pleasures, running to get away from the gloom that seemed to be ruining her 
home. 'There wasn't a car fast enough, not even Bert's new LaSalle roadster, that 
could outrun that gloom. Even Bert had protested at the speed she was going, where- 
upon she had gotten furious at him for objecting. O, how silly she had been ! Dear 
Bert, who had told her that he loved her, and whom she knew that she loved better than 
any one else in the world — yes, even dad — he was so queer. In a few more minutes 
the new roadster would probably have been over an embankment and she and Bert 
would have been killed. Yet she had gotten mad when he said: "For gosh sakes. 
Bet, you can't keep the speedometer at eighty and keep on this side of the river!" O, 




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Maid of Athens 

' l llllll l ll l llll ilMlnhllllllllllllll rl- Ill mill Minn iiiiii i ; 

what was she to do? What was the matter with her? She felt that she wanted to 
scream and scream until she was hoarse and weak. She suddenly sat up in bed, tense, 
a peculiar gleam in her eyes. Morphine! That was the solution to her problem. 
Jean, one of her friends, had taken some once and had described it all vividly. Jean 
had done it just to see what it would be like and to get a new "kick." Surely that 
would be a new "kick," and then she felt she really needed it. 

Plans formed in Betty's quick brain. She would go to Nance for it! She gave an 
involuntary shudder at the thought of old Nance, who had been a dope fiend for years. 
O, but she'd never be like that! It was only for this once. 

Betty jumped up, put on an old coat, and pulled down her rain hat over her wavy, 
black hair. She did not even take off her evening dress. With Betty, to think was to 
act. She slipped out of the house without any trouble, for her father was in the library 
with the strange Mr. Sawyer. "And that is another queer thing," she puzzled. "What 
can they have in common — two men so unlike? One, fine-looking, in spite of his break- 
ing, showing his once fine physique; and the other, a wizened little man with sparse, 
red hair, sprinkled with gray, who never has a smile for any one." She was glad that 
her father seemed to find some pleasure in his company, though they sat for hours and 
rarely spoke. It was just one more thing that she couldn't understand. 

But Betty did not have time to stop. She walked toward the worst part of town, 
where tumble-down shacks tottered on the river bank. She wouldn't admit to herself 
that she was frightened, but the shadows were unfriendly. She slipped along quietly, 
going across the muddy flats, when a dark form loomed ahead, and was all the more 
terrible because it was shapeless. She half suppressed a scream and turned to run, 
when at her outcry a head turned toward her, silhouetted against a wavery light from 
a shack — a head with horns. Betty almost fainted with relief. It was only a cow! 
Twice she stumbled and almost fell, her foot sinking into the soft ooze; but she finally 
reached Nance's hut. She stepped to the door and called softly: "Nance!" Some one 
gruniblingly pushed open the two planks used for a door and peered out. There Nance 
stood, the embodiment of all that was repulsive and the symbol of womanhood degen- 
erated to its lowest. For a moment Betty's resolution wavered, but she quickly pulled 
herself together and stepped in. 

Nance was under the influence of a recent dose, and she grinned, showing two long, 
discolored teeth protruding over one side of her lower lip. Her face was so shriveled 
that ;t resembled yellowed leather — rather soiled leather, too. For warmth she wore a 
long-, brown C5at that almost swept the floor and was stained and frayed on the edges. 
It looked ridiculous on her small body. Her dress was faded to no particular color, 
and was very muddy around the hem. She was such a thing as nightmares are made 
of as she stood grinning. In her hand was a bone she had found in some garbage can, 
while araund the room lay other refuse from the same source that had furnished meals 
in the past. Looking at her, Betty wondered if the woman were really human and 
had a soul. Could anything touch some forgotten chord in her heart and lead her to 
do a kind act? Was she capable of it, or had she descended so low that she was only a 
broken body with a fragment of mind still left to control it? Betty wondered. She 
tried to imagine this woman being kind to something, caring for a child, perhaps, and 
shuddered at the thought. No! She was not capable of it. Did Betty know, though? 

Nance looked at her, with the peculiarly wild gleam of a dope fiend in her eyes. Betty 
spoke nervously. "Er — might I get some — " she spoke hurriedly, trying not to see all 
the repulsiveness about her — "some dope, you know? Please, I must have it — can you 
let me have just one shot?" Betty was fast turning sick, and was on the psint of fall- 
ing, when with a screech Nance sprang to her and set her on a box covered with bright 
posters from a drug-store window. Nance quickly gave her the dose; and as Betty 
began to revive and the "dope" to take effect, she talked to Betty. "Yes," she squeaked, 
"they try to take me to a 'sylum, but they can't get me there. I'm not long to stay 
here now, anyway. He, he!" Nance rocked in her mirth. Then she sat in thoughtful 
silence, looking at Betty. To keep Nance from staring at her like that, Betty said: 
"Nance, why on earth don't you patch that awful-looking hole in your roof?" 

"He, he!" laughed Nance, in a cracked voice. "Well, whin it's raining, I can't; so I 
jest sets in the corner — haven't got nothing to get hurt, anyway; and when the sun's 




;trMiiiid.[iiniiMidamiiiiiidaiiimn( 

98 




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;illlllllj|||lliiiirUiniiriniiiiiiiiiiriniiiiiiiiin[iiiiMiriDinii!iimiiiniiii' 



shining, they ain't no use." And Betty was positively alarmed. Nance laughed at her 
own cleverness. 

Betty's courage and spirits now returned, and her head was beginning to whirl with 
excitement. Her pulses throbbed, and she was ready to dare anything. She rose, 
placed some money in Nance's shriveled hand, and was starting out, when Nance put 
her hand on Betty's own. Betty turned angrily to push her away. Nance said, quietly, 
pathetically, in quite a sane manner, "Be careful, little girl. Don't let it get 'cha. I 
was once like you," and let her go. Betty laughed hysterically and rushed out. 

Betty's brain seethed, and it was no wonder that when a low-slung car stopped beside 
her as she walked home and a voice from within inquired, "Give you a lift?" she got 
in without hesitation. When the figure closed the door for her, she turned and recog- 
nized the manager of Argenta's new hotel. She despised him, though the rest of the 
crowd had taken him in. His face was too smooth-shaven, his hair too slick, and his 
manner too suave. He had seemed drawn t:> her in spite of her dislike for him. He 
had asked her for a date the first time he had met her, and hardly ten minutes later. 
O, yes, a fast worker was Bailey! And he secretly considered himself so. But Betty 
didn't care now. She was supremely happy and wanted excitement. Smiling, Bailey 
turned toward her, slid his arm across her shoulders, and firmly drew her to him. He 
never wasted time. She nestled close and smiled up at him. Bailey was surprised and 
gratified. Never before had she been responsive. It filled him with a feeling of power. 

"Where to, sweetheart?" he said. 

"O, it doesn't matter really," Betty laughed. 

"0, then, let's go to the devil!" and he stepped on the gas. "We'll go to the Blue 
Lantern. How about it, little one?" 

"O, let's do! They have such marvelous music, and — " but Betty was interrupted 
unceremoniously by a kiss, and, instead of pushing him away, she submitted. 

They soon di-ew up in front of the Blue Lantern and ran up the steps. Bailey 
whirled her away to the mad rhythm of the orchestra. A figure in the owner started 
when they flashed past, Betty's head on Bailey's shoulder. The figure was Bert, and 
with him was Betty's friend, Jean, to whom he had gone for solace after Betty's out- 
burst. Jean saw her, too, and realized that something was wrong. That wild light in 
her eyes startled her. Betty seemed absolutely unconscijus of their presence. Jean 
gave Bert a quick glance. 

"The little fool!" she whispered. "Bert, do you realize that Betty isn't herself? I 
believe that I know what is the matter with her, though I never would have expected it. 
Bert, she won't last long. What can we do?" The morphine was taking effect. The 
first sensation had left, and now she was becoming drowsy. When the significance of 
Jean's words came to Bert, he would have dashed in among the dancers and taken Betty 
away by force, but Jean stopped him. "Bert," she said, guardedly — "Bert, you can't 
do that. It would only cause a scene. The management would put you out before you 
could whistle, and the gossip would involve not only you, but Betty. She is safe in 
here now. You must wait, Bert, if only for her sake." 

Just then they saw Bailey, his arm around Betty to support her, go out the door. 
Bert, telling Jean to follow, paid the bill and followed the couple out. He came upon 
Bailey trying to help Betty into the car. 

"Stop!" Bert hissed at Bailey's shoulder. 

Betty sat down suddenly on the running board, and Bert pinioned Bailey's arms 
behind him. Bert's football practice served him well, for he quickly laid Bailey, groan- 
ing, on the ground. In the meantime Jean had come up and was leading Betty to Bert's 
car. Bert saw that Bailey was only stunned; and, getting Betty into the car, he quickly 
drove off. 

When they reached Betty's home, all the house was still and dark and the wind moan- 
ing around its corners. Bert picked Betty up in his arms, as he would have done a 
baby, and he and Jean quietly carried her up to her room. All his love for her swept 
over him as he laid her down. Suddenly he leaned over and kissed her on her forehead, 
and then turned and ran down the steps. 

Betty swore that she would never again take morphine, but after a few days a desire 




;iriiiiiidbiiinimicbiiiiiiiii^iimim; 

99 




Maid of Athens 



iiiiimiiiiiiii iMirhiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiirinim-mi 



iiin'iirinimiiiniiTn 



for it became so "verpowei'ing that a second time she found her way to Nance's. And 
so it went. She drifted down. A thousand times she swore off, only to be forced to it 
again. 

One night, driven nearly wild as she realized how the habit was gripping her, with 
no power to stop, she made her way to Nance's shack. She found Nance very near 
death, for she had been taking larger and larger doses as she clung desperately to life. 
Scarcely had she stepped inside the door, when a car drew up in front, and three figures 
jumped out and filed into the door. Betty cringed. It was Bert, her father, and Mr. 
Sawyer ! Then she flung herself on her father, crying piteously. 

"O, daddy, daddy! You've come too late! It's already gotten it's grip on me, and I 
can't break loose!" 

"Betty!" whispered the old woman on the bed, and they turned suddenly to Nance — 
"Betty, I have something to tell you. I couldn't bear to see you go on as I have gone. 
Since the first few doses I have mixed some harmless stuff, and your last potion didn't 
have any dope at all in it." There was a beautiful smile in Nance's eyes, and for a 
moment they lost their wildness. She looked fir.st at Mr. Sawyer, then at Mr. Grosser. 
"I have saved Betty far you," she whispered to Mr. Grosser. She stretched out her 
hands — one to her sweetheart and one to her brother — and the once lovely Nancy 
Grosser, the belle of Argenta, passed into her last sleep. 

After a few moments, Mr. Grosser turned to find Betty, but she had gone. Betty 
and Bert had slipped out of the door, and the fast roadster was going slowly along a 
moonlit road. 

Marion D. Hill, '.31. 




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100 




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RIVERS ACADEMY 



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MISS CARRA RUTH LEE, B.S. 
Principal of Rivers Academy 



101 



Maid of Athens 



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FACULTY 



CORNELIA S. RAMOS, A.B. 

Athens College; Graduate Student, George Peabody College for Teachers. 

Instiuctor in History and Modern Languages 

MARY MOSS WELLBORN, A.B. 
Mississippi State College for Women; Graduate Student, University of Virginia. 

Instructor i)i Latin 

MRS. MARY E. SIMMONS, A.B. 

Athens College; one year Resident Graduate Work, Columbia University 

Instructor in Mathematics and Science 

CARRA RUTH LEE, B.S. 

Athens College; Graduate Student, George Peabody College for Teachers. 

Instructor in English and Bible 




;rrMiiiicL[iiiiiinid.iimiiiid3[iiniri( 



102 



Maid of Athens 




llll'lllllllllllrl.lllllllMllllllllllrlnlllllllllinillllllrhimillimilimill 




SENIORS 




103 




Maid of Athens 



iiiiriiiimiiM mirhiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiriniiiiiiiiiiMmiiiiriniiiiiMiiirTTTn 




SENIORS 



Kathrvx Allbricht 
Louise Anderson 



Ruth Elliot 

Mabel Ann Farrington 



Elise Fusch 




iLbiiiniii!icLi[iiiiiiicbiiii!!ri( 

104 



Maid of Athens 



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SENIORS 



Evelyn Reed Gray 
Mae Luker 



Elizabeth Malone 
Mary Lou Maples 



Elizabeth Morelock 
Louise White 




;rTniiiiLL[iinimicLiiiiiiiiinb[ii!iiiM; 



105 



Maid of Athens 



' H iirii i iiiiiiii iiiiri-.il 1 1 iiiimmiiiiiriniiii nil mm I miriniiiiiMni rrTTTTTi'^ 





SENIORS 



Madge Ellen McDonald 
Margaret Rosenau 
Elizabeth Salmons 



Isabelle Simmons 
Louise White 




;rT[iiirid.[iinni]id3mmmcb[iinmi, 

106 



Maid of Athens 



iiiii"iiiiiimiiriniiiii[iriiiiiiiii!inhiiiiiiiimMiiiiiirbiimiiimiiimiii 





JUNIORS 




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107 




Maid of Athens 



llHlllllllllll lHlrhlllllllimilllllllrlnllllllllllllllimirlnllllllli millll 




Rosalind Boggs 
Juliet Cannon 
Rosamond Harllee 
Louise Johnston 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Catherine Martin 
KiTTYE Belle McCormick 
Clara Mae Riley 
Frances Salmons 



Mary \elle Smith 
Gladys Swafford 
Katherine White 
Josephine Brock 




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108 



Maid of Athens 



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SOPHOMORES 




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109 



Maid of Athens 



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SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Audrey Beason 
Frankie Brown 



Cherie Giers 

Virginia Grasse 



Louise Sarver 




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Maid of Athens 



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FRESHMEN 




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111 



Maid of Athens 



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FRESHMAN CLASS 



LuELLA Chambers 


Martha Hightower 


Mary Miller 


Mattie Davison 


Joe Mae Humphries 


Pauline Walker 


Carolyn Frye 


Nellie James 


Nancy Malone 


Bessie Garrett Ball 


Anne Blythe Kirkland 


Grace Waldrop 


Zuleika Glaze 


Sadie Lawson 


Hyacinth Hicks 


Annie Frances Hightower 


Mildred Maples 


Maurice Officer 




;nimiidj|iiiiiini^iiimiii^iiimrii; 



112 



Maid of Athens 



IllllmilllllllllrUlllll 




iiNiiininiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiir htiimiimiirTTTnr 




ORGANIZATIONS 




;fr!iii[icb[iii]iiiiicLiiiiiiiiirLiiiin!rii 

113 




Maid of Athens 



i iitTii im iiii M iiirhiiiiiiiUMiiiiiiiirhiiiiiiiiiiniiimiriniiiiiiimnii 




IRVING LITERARY SOCIETY 



OFFICERS 



Evelyn Reed Gray 
Ruth Elliot .... 
Elizabeth Morelock . 

Misses Lee and Wellborn 



. President 
Vice President 
Secretary and Treasurer 
Sponsors 



Gladys Swafford 
.Madge Ellen McDonald 
Margaret Rosenau 
Evelyn Carter 
Catherine Martin 
Katherine Allbright 
Elizabeth Salmons 
Isabel Simmons 



MEMBERS 

Frankie Brown 
Louise Sarver 
KiTTYE Belle McCormick 
Grace Waldrop 
Rosamond Harllee 
Luella Chambers 
Carolyn Frye 



ZuLiEKA Glaze 

Anna Frances Hightower 

Joe Mae Humphries 

Ann Blythe Kirkland 

Nancy Malone 

Mary Miller 

Pauline Walker 



in 




114 



Maid of Athens 



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HARRIS LITERARY SOCIETY 



OFFICERS 



Mable Ann Farrington . 
Frances Salmons .... 
Mabel Wheeler 

Mrs. Simmons and Miss Ramos 



. President 
Vice President 
Secretary and Treasurer 
Sponsors 



Mary Lou Maples 
Elise Fusch 
Clara Mae Riley 
Cherie Giers 
.Audrey Beason 
Elizabeth Malone 
Ruby Rogers 
Louise Anderson 



MEMBERS 

Mary Nelle Smith 
Louise White 
Rosalind Boggs 
May Lusker 
Virginia Grasse 
Kathryn White 
Juliet Cannon 
Louise Johnson 



Mattie Davison 
Bessie Garrett 
Hyacinth Hicks 
Martha Hightower 
Nellie James 
Sadie Lawson 
Mildred Maples 
Maurice Officer 




;friiii!id.(iinimid.ii!iiiiiicbii!Mi[[i 

115 





Maid of Athens 

' i ii!T Mi ii!i i ii iimrhiiiiiiiini i im ii irii ii m i in i ni]iiiiiriniiiiiMMn i ni ii i ; 
BASKETBALL TEAM 

Elizabeth Morelock Forward 

Clara Mae Riley Forward 

Mabel Wheeler Center 

Ruth Elliot Running Center 

Rosalind Boggs Guard 

Katherine White Guard 

Katherine Allbright Guard 






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Maid of Athens 



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Mabel Ann Farrincton 
Louise Anderson 
Louise White 

Miss Cornelia Ramos 



D. D. D. CLUB 



OFFICERS 



. President 
Vice President 
Secretary and Treasurer 
Sponsor 



Katherine White 
Rosamond Harllee 
Elizabeth Morelock 



MEMBERS 

Elizabeth Salmons 
Frances Salmons 
Clara Mae Riley 



Cherie Giers 
Frances Brown 




ldblimimidj|iiiiniia.iii[i!r i ^ 

117 




Maid of Athens 



nimiiiiiini iiiiriniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiirhiiiiiiimmimiiri.iiiiiiii niinii 





Above — Tennis Club 



Below — Horseback Riders' Club 




;rrniiiid.iiin!!|iidjmillllld3[nTTTTn: 

118 



Maid of Athens 



'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiirNiiiiiiiimMiiiMirhiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiir 





Above — Hiking Club 



Below — Scouts 




,iniiiMdb[iinimid.iiimiiirLiiiiiLm; 

119 




Maid of Athens 



'lllHlllllllim MllrlnlllllllllllllllllllrlnllllllimnnillllrlnlllllMirrm 



RESUME OF ACADEMY ORGANIZATIONS 



X 



N RIVERS ACADEMY we go side by side in our athletics, clubs, and 
organizations with the college. 

There are two literary societies, the Irving and the Harris. The 
meetings are held bimonthly. Debates and other interesting features are 
held throughout the year. 

We think that we have one of the finest basketball teams ever. They 
are noted for their fair play and quickness. Many intere.sting games are 
held with out-of-town teams. The Academy boosters are ever ready with 
their pep and yells. 

The Tennis Club is composed of all who play tennis. At the end of the 
year an interesting tournament is held. 

The Swimming Club is one of the most enjoyable to the Academy girls. 
It must be because we have so many good swimmers. At one of the swim- 
ming contests the Academy came out victorious. 

Horseback riding is enjoyed by all, and the girls may be seen galloping 
over the country lanes on many a day when the weather is fair. 

Last, but by no means least, comes the Scouts. Every girl who wishes 
a good time is taken into this organization. We go on outings of all kinds ; 
and when the weather is good, we go to the Boy Scout camp on Elk River 
to spend the night. 

We are a wide-awake bunch of girls, who like both work and play. 

L. White, '29. 




Irmiiiicbiiinniiidjlllllllllxkinmni ' 



120 



Maid of Athens 




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121 




Maid of Athens 



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122 



Maid of Athens 



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iiniiiirhiiiii iiimMiiiiiirhiimmiiiirTTTTTir 




123 



Maid of Athens 




JOKES 



Miss Lee: "Mabel Ann, what is an allegory?" 
Ann: "A prehistoric animal." 

Evelyn Reed: "I pulled a dumb one last night." 
Elise: "What?" 

Evelyn Reed: "I asked Sid vi^here he got that terrible tie he had on, and he informed 
me I gave it to him last Christmas." 

Here's to the teachers! Long may they live, 
Even as long as the lessons they give. 

Joe Brock: "Who was Booker T. Washington?" 
Clara Mae: "It was George Washington's father." 
Joe Brock: "H-m, I didn't think you'd know." 

Mrs. Simmons: "Name a liquid that won't freeze." 
Katherine Martin : "Hot water." 

Frankie: "I'm sorry you're glad I'm mad at you." 
Juliet: "And I'm glad you're sorry I'm glad." 

Nellie James: "0, Pauline, I just saw Lindbergh go by!" 
Pauline: "0, yeah! When did he swim the channel?" 

Porter: "Do you all wish to sleep head first or feet first?" 
Kat. White : "I prefer to take all of my sleep at once." 

Miss Lee: "Stop pounding that typewriter! You'll drive me crazy." 
Ann: "Well, if a girl can't typewrite in her own room, then I'd like to know if a 
girl's room is her palace." 

Miss Lee: "Yes, but who wants to typewrite in a palace?" 

Lib Morelock: "I lose all of my handkerchiefs playing the piano." 
Louise Anderson: "That's where I get all of mine." 

Miss Ramos: "Rosamond, what is a nature poet?" 
Rosamond: "One that is born that way." 




IrniinicLiiiniiiiidaiiiiiiiiiriniiimm; 



124 




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EPILOGUE 



Alumiiae Association 



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Maid of Athens 



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LOCAL CHAPTER OF THE ALUMNAE 
ASSOCIATION 



OFFICERS 

Mrs. James E. Horton, Jr President 

Mrs. R. H. Richardson, Jr First Vice President 

Mrs. Jack Grey ■ Second Vice President 

Mrs. Winston Garth Third Vice President 

Mrs. Laura Chandler Treasurer 

A'Irs. Edward Goodrich Recording Secretary 

Mrs. T. B. CoFFMAN Corresponding Secretary 

Miss Sarah .Malone ... Historian 

MEMBERS 

Mrs. Ada Mae Crutcher Mrs. Grady Davis Mrs. James E. Horton, Jr. 

Mrs. Earnest Hines Mrs. Mary .Vnderson Lecg Miss Sarah Malone 

Miss Martha Williams Miss Sarah Bandy Mrs. L. C. Hightower 

Miss Macca Martin Mrs. M. Hoffman Mrs. Winston Garth 

Mrs. William Tillman Mrs. R. H. Richardson, Jr. .Mrs. Homer French 

Mrs. Florry Turntine Mrs. Edward Goodrich Mrs. W. H. Nelson 

Mrs. Walter Wilson .Mrs. Opie Clements Gilbert Miss Ozie York 

Mrs. Ben Pettus Mrs. George Wood Miss Lula Hatchett 

Mrs. Thomas Izard Mrs. A. D. Carter Mrs. W. P. Horton 

Miss Lucile Grissom Mrs. Jack Grey Mrs. Laura Chandler 

Miss Clara Nolen Mrs. Joe Sarver Mrs. T. B. Coffman 

Mrs. Luther Glaze Mrs. Tom Eubank Miss Mary Martin 

Mrs. W. G. Martin .Mrs. W. W. Simmons 
Miss Jennie Yarbrough 




Mrs. Anne Berey 

The oldest living alumna of Athens College, who attended school in Athens in 1853. 

She is now enjoying excellent health at her home in Uniontown, Ky. 



125 



Maid of Athens 

' i iiiTii ii i i iiii iiiiinhiiiiiiiiiiiiii ii i i irh ll lllimimi i n i lriniimiMMir TrmT; 




THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 



^IHE alumnae Association of Athens College, which is a very active or- 
ganization, is always ready to back the college in all of its undertak- 



ings. It is a very important agency in the development of the college. 

The local chapter of the Athens College Alumnse Association has held its 
monthly meetings on the first Tuesday of every month in the main recep- 
tion room of Founder's Hall. During the current school year extensive 
plans have been made to complete payment on the large pipe organ which 
this association chapter presented to the college four years ago. Their 
activities have included rummage sales, oyster and turkey dinners, Kiwanis 
meals, sponsoring the picture, "The Fool," Birmingham-Southern Glee 
Club, a Christmas seals book, and an operetta. Something over a thou- 
sand dollars has resulted from these untiring efforts, and the total indebt- 
edness of the chapter has been cared for. 

Another evidence of their generosity is found in the prize of twenty 
dollars in gold given to the best music student at the close of the school 
year. Pledges to the endowment campaign of this college greatly facili- 
tated the local total. The chapter was divided into groups, which can- 
vassed the business section of Athens. Personal subscriptions and letters 
to friends who were interested supplemented the total. 




;rTr]ii!id.iiii]Miud3ni]iiiiici._iim_im 

126 



Maid of Athens 



;illlllllllllllllllrUllllinrillllllllllnlnlllllllllllllllllllrbllimillllllllllll 





-^^noniiinioiininnDii]^^ 



-^ 



We Patronize Those 



ze us 





127 



^IiiinrHiltMinMiuMnriiiuiiinMiiiMniiiiiMiiuMiniiiiMMiiMiiiiiiiiiiniriiiiriiirriiiiiiiirMiiriiiiMiitMiiNiiiMinMiiiiiiiiniitniHiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiintiiiitiniriiHiiiiMiiii^ 



HIGH IDEALS 



Young Ladies: Wc congratulate you on your good fortune in being stu- 
dents of Athens College for Young Women. 
You have chosen a school of high ideals. 

Wc. too. have high ideals and have enjoyed ?1 years of uninterrupted 
prosperity. 

Our business has grown from practically nothing to the largest department 
store between Nashville and Birmingham, and Chattanooga and Memphis. 

Won't you give us the pleasure of showii.^ you through our modern store.' 
You will enjoy the displays of fine Ready-to-Wear. Mil- 
linery. Silk Underwear. Hosiery and Beautiful Shoes. 

The things you find in an up-to-date, big city store arc 
sold here at a saving of 25'^. 

We will be delighted to have you as our guest. 
Cordially, 

^og,ers department Store 



One Price 



FLORENCE. ALABAMA 
T. M. and B. A. Rogers 



Plain Figures 



riiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiriiiitiiiiniiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii'itiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiti 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



^iiiliirtiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiTiiirtiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiniiitiiiiMiiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiuiiiiriiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiniiiitiiiiiiiiriiiiMiitiiiiiiiiniiiniiitiiiiiiiKiiiiriiniiiiMiiiiiiiniiiiriiiriiiiri 

I G/lfter Graduation, Tlien What? 

I SOME MARRY — and when they do, the wise 

1 girl insists on hving where she can get Electric 

I Service from the — 

I c/llaLama *^ower Compan}/^ 



Safety 



Service 



[5 



iiiiiiiiiniiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiniiiniiiiMiiiiiiniiiiiiiiii 



iiMiiiiiiniiiitiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiniiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiPiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiPiiiriiiiiiiiiniiiiMr; 
jiiriiiirniiiiiiiitiiiriiiiitiiiiMiiuiiirMiiriiiniiiiMiiniiiriiiiriiiitiiiniiiMiiitniHiiiiriiiniiiiMiitiiii Mill Mil MiiitiiitriiiMiiitMiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiUMiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiltiiiiiiiiriiiii Mill iiiiuiiiriiii 

I King's enlarged and better store makes Florence a still | 

I better place to shop. i 

= 3 

= 3 

I H. *\P. Kin^ Company^ | 

I FLORENCE ALABAMA I 



nlllUIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIItlllUIIINIIMIIIIIIIIinilllllllllllMIIMIIIMIIMIIIinillHIIIIIIItlllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIII^ 



Thomas Catlyle said """""" iiiiiiimjiii jjn niiiiimiiriini miimiii MijiMiiiMiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiimiirui^ 

i ■All lliat iii^mkln.l lias done, Ihoiiiilil. ealni'd ur l.ei-u, is lylns iis in maBi<- inesenatlon in the - 

E pages or books. They are the chosen possession ol jnen ,■ o ■" i i ^ 

I A Certificate of Membersfyip in Mirns &■ Company Provides \ 

E 1st. That Ihlrly-sis books will be sent to you, one each month for thlrly-slx months = 

= 2n;l. That you can eet through Mlms & Company any book that any publisher has In stork at = 

E cost, plus postage. 5 

E 3rd. That for three years you will share in the iirnhls made hy Jflms & Company just as though E 

= you owned stock in the corporation. = 

E BOOK PUBLISHERS E 

i MIMS « COMPANY \ 

I MUSCLE SHOALS. COLBERT COUNTY. ALABAMA I 

I ADVISORY BOARD I 

= Helen Keller. Marie ISankhead Owen, Maud Lindsay, Thomas Dixon. Jr., S. S. Minis .Tulia Talt Shearon 

I Katharine Hopkins Chapman, M.iry .Mims. Alice Alison Lide * e 

''"""""""" """iiii" uiinniiiiiin iiiiiuiiiuiinMuniiniiiriiiniiii iiiimiimi iiiMiimiii niiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiniiinMiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiif 

^iiiiiiniiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiinniniinMiniiiniiiiiiiniiiiuiiiMiouiinniiiiiniiiiniiiuiin-; 



V/e Welcome You 

WE SHOE AND CLOTHE 

Tlje Entire Family 

SPEAKE, WARREN 
& RATLIFF 

SECOND AVENUE 

DECATUR. ALABAMA 



READ THE ADS 



^<i tiiii liiMiiiiiiiriiniiniiiiiiiinriiimnitiiiriiiiiriiii iriiu 

LET LANDRUM 

I A/afte Your Pfioto--He Knows How 
I KODAK FINISHING SPECIALTY 

I Florence. Ala. 

E MAIL US YOUR FILMS 



^"" ' luui iiMiniiiltiiiu uiiiniiii i nut r riiiiiriiiiMin iiiiiu itiiiiiiiul i nun uiiiuiiii r 

g' ' ' uiiiuiuiiiniiin n null i i i^ ini nun i i luinuiiiuiiiuiniiiniiiuiiiuiiiuiii 



A. Z. BAILEY GROCERY 
COMPANY 

Wfiolesale Distributors 
DECATUR, ALABAMA 



■■ 'Uiiniiiii 1 luiiiiiiii iiini iiiHiuii luiiuinuiiE niiiiiuili i iiliniiin uuiiuiiiuiiiuin uiiiiiiiiiiiiii t r 

|iiUiinuiniiiiiriiuiiHi i uiiiiliiumuiiii riiiiriin iiiii: liiiiii uiiiiiiii niiiuiiiuinuiniiiiriiniiHiiiniiin iiiiiuiiiiriiiiiilliruni- 



Compliments of 

PIGGLY WIGGLY 



"All Over the World" 



"■■" ■■■! riiiiMiiiiiiiriiiitiiiniiniiiiriiiiriiiiMiiiriii iiiiiiiiiiii 



' ""~ -iriiiiiiuriiiiiiiiitiiniiiiiiiiiriiir itiiii riiiiriiiiriiur Jiniutiiiitiiinf? 

jiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiirtiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiimtmiiimiimiiNnm iiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiniu ::iiiiriiir niiiiriiiiiiiiiiiinii 



5 fn Huntsville — Visit = 

FOWLER BROS. 

I Ladies' RcatJy-to-Wear, Slippers. i 

I Hosiery | 

I JEFFERSON STREET | 

.-illiiuiiuiiniiinuiniiiuiiniiliuiiiuiiuiiiuiiiriiiuiintiinuinuinuiiuuiuinuiiiiiiiiii^ 




Compliments of 



THE ACORN STORE 



DECATUR, ALA 



"The Place to Eat" 

HARMONY CAFE 



SHEFFIELD. ALABAMA 



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Compliments of 

Howie Drug Company 

SHEFFIELD, ALA. 



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cXumLer 




^us Line 



Running from Huntsville to Sheffield via Athens. Rogersvilie 

and Florence 

Branch Line from Pulaski to Decatur via Ardmore and Athens 

Connections with L. Z-i N. Trains at Athens and Decatur: Southern Trains 
at Huntsville and Sheffield 




E^^ "When a Minute Means a Lot to You — Take a Bus" '^^"^^l 

OPERATED BY 

*TR. cv4. CKamlDers & Sons 

Auto Accessories, Transfer and Taxi Service 



PHONE NO. 7 



ATHENS. ALABAMA 




Athens College for Young Women 



ATHENS, ALABAMA 



EIGHTY-FIFTH YEAR 



A College With a Past and With a Future 



Nearl}' one thousand feet above sea level. Splendid health conditions. 
Accredited by the Alaljama Association of Colleges and Departments 
of Education of other States. A.B. and B.S. Degrees. Pipe Organ. 
Excellent Department of Music, Home Economics. Endowment sub- 
scri])tions and annuities now amounting to $420,000. \\'rite for catalog. 



AUTOGRAPHS 



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